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The Highlander

1989 TV surpasses popular expectations

Taylor Swift’s 1989 rerecording proves to be a hit
Taylor Swift releases re-recording of 1989, last Friday, Oct. 27.
Pitchfork
Taylor Swift releases re-recording of 1989, last Friday, Oct. 27.

Rating- 4.5/5

Universal sensation Taylor Swift released her rerecording of her iconic pop album “1989” on Oct. 27. The album allows Taylor to regain the rights to yet another one of her albums. “1989 TV (Taylor’s Version)” features more mature vocals and slight, but impactful differences in already famous songs, and five vault (unreleased) tracks.
The album features “1989” classic Swiftie favorites, such as “Shake it Off” and “Style.” Many of these beloved songs remain unchanged, but a few feature new instrumentals and vocals.
In every re-release, Swift includes unreleased “vault songs,” and the “1989” vault songs certainly did not disappoint.
The first vault song is called “Slut!”, a controversial and intriguing name. Many Swifties thought that “Slut!” would be an upbeat song, such as “Me!” or “You Need to Calm Down” from her pop album Lover, but it is actually a slower, more thoughtful love song. The lines “and if they call me a slut, you know it might be worth it for once” and “might as well be drunk in love,” form the idea of how Swift embraced the negativity of the public despite constant criticism from the media.
Following “Slut!”, Swift changes the mood with the song “Say Don’t Go,” a song that recaps a feeling of betrayal in Swift’s past. The song illustrates Swift’s feelings of remembrance and longing towards her past. Swift tells the listeners how she feels betrayed and used, and how this causes her to feel haunted when looking at the past and what could have been.
The third vault song, titled “Now That We Don’t Talk,” narrates the pain of a fallout with someone and is rumored to be about pop singer Harry Styles. Swift describes how she feels free, not being tied down by a toxic relationship, saying “I called my mom, she said that it was for the best.”
Swift’s next song is a song recounting a dream of love, titled “Suburban Legends.” The song has upbeat instrumental music, and follows a very similar style of her previous album “Midnights.”
The last and fan-favorite out of all the vault songs is “Is it Over Now.” The track alludes to Swift’s failed relationship with Styles. Swift bashes him with passive aggressive lyrics, saying “your new girl is my clone” and “if she’s got blue eyes, I will surmise that you’ll probably date her.”
“1989 TV” creates a world of nostalgia among listeners and Swift. The iconic album features track after track of repeat worthy music, which incorporate the topics of loss, revenge and relationships in Swift’s life. “1989 TV” is sure to leave a lasting mark for years to come, as the themes of the songs revolve around the universal ideas of love and heartbreak.

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