News story publication from summer class

News+story+publication+from+summer+class

As part of the FCPS summer writing program, students learned a variety of writing skills ranging from creative style to nonfiction. Below is a feature of excellent student work in journalism news writing.

Students used the Newseum’s close in D.C. as a practice prompt to sharpen their understandings in media and news reporting. For most students, it is their first time writing journalism articles.

(Names are listed alphabetically)

Weston Borodin, 8th Grade, Thoreau Middle School

The Newseum in Washington, DC is coming to a close. The Newseum which is on Pennsylvania Ave has been bought by Johns Hopkins for 372.4 million dollars. The Newseum will close down on December 31, 2020. They have already moved out their items and the building is now getting renovations for Johns Hopkins to move in. There are people who loved going to The Newseum.
“I love going to The Newseum with my grandmother! My favorite part was seeing pictures of the past couple presidents’ dogs,” said Mara Dyer, Freshman at Mclean Highschool.

“I’m really sad that The Newseum is closing. It was an amazing place and I gained so much knowledge and I hope I’ll be able to go to the new establishment once it’s relocated,” Dyer said.

This closing of The Newseum will also have a lot of people out of a job. A lot of people liked their jobs at The Newseum.
“I’ve been working there for about 10 years so I am extremely disappointed that I won’t get to meet kids from all over who are just as interested in these artifacts as I am,” said Jane Donovan, Tour Guide for The Newseum.

Johns Hopkins now has an extension to their main campus so now they will have an even bigger campus.

“I saw an opportunity to buy a great building and took it! I am excited to have my university use this space,” said Ronald Daniels, President of Johns Hopkins.
This will now mean they will be able to have more students and if people in Washington want to be near their home and want to go to Johns Hopkins they can.

“I believe that knowledge is truly important whether it comes in any form. I’m looking forward to seeing this extension of the campus lead to great learning opportunities for students!” said Daniels.

Now Johns Hopkins will be in Washington which means that some people will have to relocate and are opposed to this.

“Honestly, I don’t want to be relocated to DC because I’ve been teaching on our campus for so long and I’ve grown quite fond of it,” said Tina Summers, Professor at Johns Hopkins.
While others are excited to go to DC and start to learn in a new environment.

“It’s a shame that they have to shut The Newseum down, but it’s an amazing opportunity for Hopkins students to head on over to DC!” said, Caroline Michaelson, Junior at Johns Hopkins.

Johns Hopkins buying The Newseum will most likely be good in the long run to expand the amount of students and teachers allowing more people to have a chance to go to Johns Hopkins. Even though Johns Hopkins is buying out The Newseum, a lot of people will still have good memories there.

“I will miss visiting the photography exhibit and getting to see all the talented photographers!” said Nina Zenik, Photojournalist for the New York Times.

Morgan Hueber, 7th Grade, Saint Luke School

The Newseum in Washington DC has been bought by Johns Hopkins University for 372.4 million dollars. It will be closing on December 31, 2019. It will be renovated to be used as part of the campus. “I saw an opportunity to buy a great building, and I took it.” said Ronald Daniels, President of Johns Hopkins University, “I am excited to use this space for my university.”
Some people aren’t so excited though. “Honestly, I don’t want to be relocated to DC because I’ve been teaching on our campus for so long and I’ve grown quite fond of it.” said Tina Summers, Professor at Johns Hopkins University.”
Many will miss it, including some from our area.
“I’m really sad that the Newseum is closing. It was an amazing place and I gained so much knowledge and I hope I’ll be able to go to the new establishment once it’s relocated.” Said Mara Dyer.

Christy Li, 6th Grade & Sophie Li, 4th Grade, Churchhill Elementary School

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Amelia Nunez, 5th Grade, Oakton Elementary School

A tragedy, some might say. Good news, others may state. The Newseum, located on Pennsylvania Ave. in Washington, D.C., closed down on December 31 of last year, 2019. Johns Hopkins University bought the building for $372.4 million.
“I saw an opportunity to buy a great building and I took it! I am excit- ed to have my university use this space,” said Ronald Daniels, president of Johns Hopkins University.
The Newseum cleared out all of the things inside so some students at the University can be moved there.
“I’m really sad that the Newseum is closing. It was an amazing place and I gained so much knowledge and I hope I’ll be able to go to the new establishment once it’s relocated,” said Mara Dyer, a freshman at McLean high school.
While I’ve never been to the Newseum, I can understand why many people are sad, and even slightly angry, at its closing. Take a tour guide at the museum, for example.
“I’ve been working there for about 10 years so I am extremely disappointed that I won’t get to meet kids from all over who are just as interested in these artifacts as I am,” Jane Donovan said.
Another person who isn’t very happy with the Newseum’s building becoming an extension for Johns Hopkins University is a professor at that university.
“Honestly, I don’t want to be relocated to D.C. because I’ve been teaching on our campus for so long and I’ve grown quite fond of it,” Tina Summers said.
There is someone who isn’t happy about the museum closing, but excited for the students who will be moved to D.C.
“It’s a shame that they have to shut down the Newseum but it’s an amazing opportunity for Hopkins students to head on over to D.C.!” said Caroline Michaelson, a junior at Johns Hopkins University.

A tragedy, some might say. Good news, others may state. The Newseum, located on Pennsylvania Ave. in Washington, D.C., closed down on Decem- ber 31 of last year, 2019. Johns Hopkins Universi- ty bought the building for $372.4 million.
“I saw an opportunity to buy a great building and I took it! I am excit- ed to have my university use this space,” said Ro- nald Daniels, president of Johns Hopkins Unive- rsity.
The Newseum cleared out all of the things ins- ide so some students at the University can be moved there.
“I’m really sad that the Newseum is closing. It was an amazing place and I gained so much knowledge and I hope I’ll be able to go to the new establishment once it’s relocated,” said Mara Dyer, a freshman at McLean high school.
While I’ve never been to the Newseum, I can understand why many people are sad, and even slightly angry, at its clo- sing. Take a tour guide at the museum, for example.
“I’ve been working th- ere for about 10 years so I am extremely disappo- inted that I won’t get to meet kids from all over who are just as interest- ed in these artifacts as I am,” Jane Donovan said.
Another person who isn’t very happy with the Newseum’s building becoming an extension for Johns Hopkins Univ- ersity is a professor at that university.
“Honestly, I don’t want to be relocated to D.C. because I’ve been teach- ing on our campus for so long and I’ve grown quite fond of it,” Tina Summers said.
There is someone who isn’t happy about the museum closing, but excited for the students who will be moved to D.C.
“It’s a shame that they have to shut down the Newseum but it’s an a- mazing opportunity for Hopkins students to head on over to D.C.!” said Caroline Michaels- on, a junior at Johns Hopkins University.

Soliana Selassie, 7th Grade, Twain Middle School

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Reya Simhadri, 5th Grade, Westbrair Elementary School

Johns Hopkins University has bought D.C.’s Newseum. Johns Hopkins University is moving to DC on December 31st.

The Newseum’s Closure had lots of reactions. Some were sad and some were happy for Hopkins university. The Newseum was a famous and creative mewseum that many people loved.

“I love going to the newseum with my grandmother! My favorite part was seeing pictures of the past couple presidents’ dogs,” said Mara Dyer, Freshman at McLean HighSchool.

The Newseum was bought for $372.4 Million by johns hopkins university.many people were glad about how the students of johns hopkins University can go to DC, even though they are sad that the Newseum has to shut down.

“It’s a shame that they have to shut the Newseum down, but it’s an amazing opportunity for Hopkins students to head on over to DC!” said Caroline Michaelson, Junior at Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University boutght the Newseum for a lot of money and the Newseum took it even though they knew that the Newseum would have to go.

“I decided to sell the Newseum because Johns Hopkins University was offering us a large amount of money. I am sad to see the Newseum go but I am excited for the future!”said Jan Neuharth, previous owner of the Newseum.

Riddhi Simhadri, 8th Grade, Kilmer Middle School

The Newseum in DC is closing on December 31st! John Hopkins University is buying the Newseum for students.
Many people loved visiting the Newseum, and it was an inspiration to many kids. They learned new things and gained knowledge because of the Newseum, but now it’s closing down, so many kids are sad to know that they won’t be able to visit the Newseum anymore!
“I love going to the Newseum with my grandmother! My favorite part was seeing pictures of the past couple presidents’ dogs,” said Mara Dyer, Freshman at McLean High School.
Just like Dyer, many other students love visiting the Newseum, let’s see how Dyer reacted to the Newseum closing.
“I’m really sad that the Newseum is closing. It was an amazing place and I gained so much knowledge and I hope I’ll be able to go to the new establishment once it’s relocated,” Dyer said.

Asha Singhal, 7th Grade, Thoreau Middle School

The Newseum, an interactive museum in Washington D.C. that celebrates journalism and freedom of the press, has closed down after John Hopkins University bought the building for 372.5 million dollars. Ronald Daniels, president of Johns Hopkins University, has said: “I saw an opportunity to buy a great building and took it! I am excited to have my university use this space.”

Some employees of the collage have expressed disheartenment at the prospect of teaching at the alternative location. Tina Summers, one of the Professors at Johns Hopkins University has observed: “Honestly, I don’t want to be relocated to DC because I’ve been teaching on our campus for so long and I’ve grown quite fond of it. However, a few students at John Hopkins University are excited for the change. Caroline Michaelson, a junior at Johns Hopkins University, commented “It’s a shame that they have to shut the Newseum down, but it’s an amazing opportunity for Hopkins students to head on over to DC!”

Many people have also recently expressed their condolences the Newseum was closing down, and lamented that they had made some pleasant memories there in the past. Mara Dyer, a freshman at McLean high school commented: “I loved going to the Newseum with my grandmother! My favorite part was seeing pictures of the past couple presidents’ dogs. I’m really sad that the Newseum is closing. It was an amazing place and I gained so much knowledge and I hope I’ll be able to go to the new establishment once it’s relocated.” Former staff of the famous attraction have also been expressing their grief that the Newseum is closing. Jane Donovan, a tour guide at the Newseum, stated: “I’ve been working there for about 10 years so I am extremely disappointed that I won’t get to meet kids from all over who are just as interested in these artifacts as I am.”

The Newseum’s official closing date was 5:00 pm on December 31st 2019. Since then, all of the items that were on display at the museum have since been either put into storage or returned to the owners. It has been unknown whether the Newseum is seeking a new location to reopen, or if they had any success with their search if this is true. It has also has been made known that John Hopkins University has been experimenting with many different plans to redesign the building to make it suitable for student use ever since early July. These plans include removing the first amendment excerpt that is engraved on the stone facade of the former museum and renovating the interior.

Jan Neuharth, former owner of the Newseum, has expressed enthusiasm for the sale of the building and for the any eventual plans for the exhibits. She declared this to the public by saying “ I decided to sell the Newseum because Johns Hopkins University was offering us a large amount of money. I am sad to see the Newseum go but I am excited for the future!”