A supercalifragilisticexpialidocious sequel

The return of the joyful, adventurous, fun loving nanny who we all know and love

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A supercalifragilisticexpialidocious sequel

Walt Disney Productions

Walt Disney Productions

Walt Disney Productions

Eric Mizusawa, Online News Editor

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After 54 years of being away, the beloved Mrs. Poppins returns in theaters warming the hearts of children swayed by her creativity through song and imagery, and adults, nostalgic of her first appearance to the Bank household in 1964.

In the beginning, Poppins returns to London on her umbrella and reunites siblings Michael and Jane Banks, the children she raised in the original, who we learn are conflicted with their bank after hearing their house may be foreclosed. The children of Mr. Bank, whose wife is long passed, await the fantasies they have yet to discover from Poppins herself, in her attempt to rid them of the tragedy that the family has encountered.

From the opening shot of Bert, the chimney sweep everyone in the Poppins’ world adores, to the mystical journeys Poppins leads, the movie reconnects the experiences of the original movie with a different story to tell, allowing the audience to reminisce on the joy from the original. And Poppins, being her upbeat self, manages to show the children the good side of everything through song and imagination to show the good behind them breaking their parents’ expensive vase.

Throughout the entirety of the script, the movie manages to maintain a playful sense of lighthearted fun and comical integrity using a sort of unpractical reality that veers away from being too excessive or redundant in its many gags, such as when Poppins, Bert, and the three children perfectly balance themselves on a bicycle, riding down the street as the children begin to giggle.

One of the downsides of this lighthearted fun, however, is its inability to convey the proper mood among the audience at certain points, being that the true sorrow of their father may be diluted by the acting of the children and their inappropriate timing of the song. While this may be due to the fact that the movie is targeted at a younger audience, it dilutes the overall emotional integrity, something I felt they could have done a much better job of maintaining.

Another fault is their failure to connect many parts of the plot, including how up until the end, the journey of the children seem to distract from what Michael and Jane are experiencing at the same time. A similar example involves the reuniting of Mary Poppins to the original Bank children, as it didn’t invoke the emotional reuniting as I had predicted it would.

Overall, this is a fantastic work of art on behalf of Disney, and despite its improperly conveying emotions, it portrays extreme excellence on part of a nanny whose goal is to provide children with the joys in life even in the darkest of times. In conclusion, this movie is pure brilliance, and I totally recommend you go see it.

Rating: 5/5 Umbrellas

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